Sunday, December 8, 2013

Suffering is from Resisting Pain

Suffering is not caused by pain but by resisting pain.
 -Unknown-

(I like reading with theme music)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oa-ae6_okmg




Today I learned that the toughest athlete in the world is a 62 year-old woman.

 Spanning back 35 years to the first try, 1978, but especially these past four years.
From August, 2009, to Labor Day, 2013, there was nothing but Cuba.

 Every day, every hour, the focus was laser sharp. No stone unturned 

62-year-old Diana Nyad swam without a shark cage 103 miles
between Cuba and Florida !


  Despite deadly Box Jellyfish stings,
Diana courageously continued for 41  hours,

 eventually compromised by the physical effects of the stings.
 A year later, she again faced the seemingly impossible,
 this time with a secret weapon:
a jellyfish suit, a thin nylon covering that prevents stings.
  She swam 51 hours, 5 minutes, much of the country following her every stroke.
 Again the jellyfish attacked, striking her repeatedly on the lips,
where the nylon suit opens to allow her to breathe.
Life-threatening lightning storms and the powerful Gulf Stream
 current literally spun the Teams fleet compasses in circles,
shoving Diana on a winding route of nearly 100 miles through the water
 before the team had to removed her.
On Labor day 2013 she emerged on Smathers beach and gave us a message..

Nothing is impossible !!

What keeps us from being super acheivers ?
In my case, it was crippling fear, but in generalization,
 it’s attachment to any negative self-talk you have.
 

Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.

-Helen Keller-






By giving up my attachment to that abusive inner dialogue,
I was able to release
the fear and anxiety associated with change
or the possibility of failure.

 I was able to look at it objectively by removing myself from it emotionally.
I have to remind myself every day to hold onto that objectivity and release the fear,
 but so far it’s working.